Vagabond

Vagabond

Opdrachtgever: ShabbyShabbyAppartments
Opdracht: Installatie
Type: Ontwerp, uitvoering
Locatie: Munchen (D)
Samenwerking: MeaCulpa
Oplevering: 03-09-2015
Toelichting:

In their book Collage city Colin Rowe an Fred Koetter warn us for the decline of collective space when they state: ‘The traditional city goes away; but even the parody of the city of modern architecture refuses to become established. The public realm has shrunk to an apologetic ghost but the private realm has not been significantly enriched.’ This same warning is echoed in the accompanying text to ShabbyShabby apartments, when it states: ‘Space is not a luxury…but a necessity’ and ‘Housing should be a public value that relates to other common goods.’ Collective space is the sum of private, semi-public and public space, its decline into the waning public space threatens the social fabric of the city.

In his essay ‘Vagabond architecture’, Anthony Vidler discusses a change in how we look upon the city. No longer do we see the city as fixed urban architecture, but as mobile and nomadic. This countermonumentality has a long tradition of supporters in modernism, from Le Corbusier to Buckminster Fuller. According to Vidler, the modern city dweller lives in houses like tents (Maison Domino) or houses like cars (Maison Citrohan). To this we can add postmodern constructs, like installations for houses (Slow house) and houses like prostheses (Maison à Bordeaux), all examples of domiciles that are disconnected from the city and used as vehicles of change.

Within this countermonumentality, the nomad had been a steady figure in architectural discourse. In fact, the nomad has become architecture. He or she doesn’t need design to become an architectural paradigm. When residing in public or semi-public space, the nomad defines the architecture of the city. Against this uprooting of the domicile, Vidler places the architectural animals of John Hejduk (as used in his works Victims and Vladivostok). ‘These hordes invade its ‘host’ cities like a band of ruffians’ and ‘repopulate the city’. Hejduk created houses for vagabonds that travel from city to city, always seeking domicile, but not always remaining. These vagabonds contrast the modernist nomad, because they actually try to create a domicile in the place they reside at, be it a temporary one. Theyhave created a realm between the public and the semi-public; a privileged space. As Hejduk’s animals plug in to their host cities, they create a space that’s only accessible for insiders. They are similar to the spaces created by Lebbeus Woods; one needs to know how to access them.

Historically, according to Vidler, the vagabond is a wanderer that places itself outside of society. They wander the city much like the situationists did in their Dérive, thus seeking to create their own social space. In that sense, these vagabonds contrast the tourist, the post-modernist nomad. In present time, where the borders between public, semi-public and private have been defined more clearly, the vagabond is uprooted, more and more forced to become a mere tourist. The only places open to him are places of spectacle, disconnected from domicile. Only by force, public access through drastic means, can the intricate system of social space in the city be saved and enriched. A simple door might be the answer to the decline of layered, collective space. It is our answer to the growing segregation and loss of communicative bonds in an ever more overcrowding cityscape.

There is no front facade, only a front door.

(Diller + Scofidio on SLOW HOUSE)

inzending pagina 1
inzending pagina 2
inzending pagina 3

Opdrachtgever: ShabbyShabbyAppartments
Opdracht: Installatie
Type: Ontwerp, uitvoering
Locatie: Munchen (D)
Samenwerking: MeaCulpa
Oplevering: 03-09-2015
Toelichting:

In their book Collage city Colin Rowe an Fred Koetter warn us for the decline of collective space when they state: ‘The traditional city goes away; but even the parody of the city of modern architecture refuses to become established. The public realm has shrunk to an apologetic ghost but the private realm has not been significantly enriched.’ This same warning is echoed in the accompanying text to ShabbyShabby apartments, when it states: ‘Space is not a luxury…but a necessity’ and ‘Housing should be a public value that relates to other common goods.’ Collective space is the sum of private, semi-public and public space, its decline into the waning public space threatens the social fabric of the city.

In his essay ‘Vagabond architecture’, Anthony Vidler discusses a change in how we look upon the city. No longer do we see the city as fixed urban architecture, but as mobile and nomadic. This countermonumentality has a long tradition of supporters in modernism, from Le Corbusier to Buckminster Fuller. According to Vidler, the modern city dweller lives in houses like tents (Maison Domino) or houses like cars (Maison Citrohan). To this we can add postmodern constructs, like installations for houses (Slow house) and houses like prostheses (Maison à Bordeaux), all examples of domiciles that are disconnected from the city and used as vehicles of change.

Within this countermonumentality, the nomad had been a steady figure in architectural discourse. In fact, the nomad has become architecture. He or she doesn’t need design to become an architectural paradigm. When residing in public or semi-public space, the nomad defines the architecture of the city. Against this uprooting of the domicile, Vidler places the architectural animals of John Hejduk (as used in his works Victims and Vladivostok). ‘These hordes invade its ‘host’ cities like a band of ruffians’ and ‘repopulate the city’. Hejduk created houses for vagabonds that travel from city to city, always seeking domicile, but not always remaining. These vagabonds contrast the modernist nomad, because they actually try to create a domicile in the place they reside at, be it a temporary one. Theyhave created a realm between the public and the semi-public; a privileged space. As Hejduk’s animals plug in to their host cities, they create a space that’s only accessible for insiders. They are similar to the spaces created by Lebbeus Woods; one needs to know how to access them.

Historically, according to Vidler, the vagabond is a wanderer that places itself outside of society. They wander the city much like the situationists did in their Dérive, thus seeking to create their own social space. In that sense, these vagabonds contrast the tourist, the post-modernist nomad. In present time, where the borders between public, semi-public and private have been defined more clearly, the vagabond is uprooted, more and more forced to become a mere tourist. The only places open to him are places of spectacle, disconnected from domicile. Only by force, public access through drastic means, can the intricate system of social space in the city be saved and enriched. A simple door might be the answer to the decline of layered, collective space. It is our answer to the growing segregation and loss of communicative bonds in an ever more overcrowding cityscape.

There is no front facade, only a front door.

(Diller + Scofidio on SLOW HOUSE)
Scroll naar boven